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Electronic Health Record Logs Indicate That Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine

Overview of attention for article published in Health Affairs, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
527 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
126 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
163 Mendeley
Title
Electronic Health Record Logs Indicate That Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine
Published in
Health Affairs, April 2017
DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2016.0811
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ming Tai-Seale, Cliff W. Olson, Jinnan Li, Albert S. Chan, Criss Morikawa, Meg Durbin, Wei Wang, Harold S. Luft

Abstract

Time spent by physicians is a key resource in health care delivery. This study used data captured by the access time stamp functionality of an electronic health record (EHR) to examine physician work effort. This is a potentially powerful, yet unobtrusive, way to study physicians' use of time. We used data on physicians' time allocation patterns captured by over thirty-one million EHR transactions in the period 2011-14 recorded by 471 primary care physicians, who collectively worked on 765,129 patients' EHRs. Our results suggest that the physicians logged an average of 3.08 hours on office visits and 3.17 hours on desktop medicine each day. Desktop medicine consists of activities such as communicating with patients through a secure patient portal, responding to patients' online requests for prescription refills or medical advice, ordering tests, sending staff messages, and reviewing test results. Over time, log records from physicians showed a decline in the time allocated to face-to-face visits, accompanied by an increase in time allocated to desktop medicine. Staffing and scheduling in the physician's office, as well as provider payment models for primary care practice, should account for these desktop medicine efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 527 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 163 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 163 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 20%
Student > Master 20 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 12%
Other 15 9%
Professor 13 8%
Other 36 22%
Unknown 27 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 40%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 7%
Computer Science 9 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 5%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 37 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 516. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2020.
All research outputs
#25,533
of 17,407,080 outputs
Outputs from Health Affairs
#102
of 5,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#869
of 272,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Affairs
#8
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,407,080 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,779 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,823 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.